Tag Archives: Telescope

Solar Eclipse Of The Sun, 20.03.2015

Perfect conditions for watching the solar eclipse of the sun this last Friday morning! It´s been “only” a partial eclipse of the Sun in Lower Bavaria, Germany, where I live, but nonetheless a day to remember. More info (in German): http://eclipse.astronomie.info/2015-03-20/ . And again, Thierry Legault nailed it big-time: http://www.astrophoto.fr/eclipse-iss-20150320.html . Enjoy!

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IMG_7079-1“Point of view…”

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Set-up…

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SoFi.2015.Collage.5-1Sequences…

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My Favorite Images Of July 2012

 

A bit late, but here are my favorite images from July 2012; a mix of telescope imaging and “normal” stuff….Enjoy!

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Mare Nectaris with its bordering craters Theophilus (top center) and Fracastorius (one-third from top, slightly off-center); the “line” between light and dark is called “Terminator”…

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Constellations addendum – the Moon covered by the telescope…

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The “fixed” stars marking the beginning of each trail…

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Looks like the almost full Moon is “squeezing” out of the old smoke stack…

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The Milky Way is most prominent during the summer month, especially in August…

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The waxing crescent Moon – setting during nautical twilight…

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Two telescope images of the gibbous Moon stitched to a mosaic, full size – no crop…

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“It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

(Neil Armstrong, American Astronaut, 1930-2012)
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Saturn In Focus

Saturn is probably the most exciting planet on the firmament to watch. Looking through a telescope and spotting this gas giant with its ring system is something remarkable one will never forget. You can find this science-fiction-like planet for the next couple of weeks  at the constellation of Virgin, just above the bright star Spica. Saturn got about 60 circling moons, but only a few can be seen with an amateur telescope. Imaging planets is best done with a CCD-camera in video modus and stacking a couple of hundred single shots from the video with software. Since I don´t have one (yet), I only take single shots, which is good for getting familiar with the equipment.

Single shot of Saturn with Meade 8″ ACF, LXD 75, 9 mm Plössl, 2 x Barlow, Pentax k-x, 10 sec., Iso 100, no crop;

Meade 8″ ACF is the telescope, LXD 75 is an equatorial mount, Plössl´s are ocular, a Barlow lens works like a tele converter with a camera. The 8″ got a focal length of 2000 mm and a f 10 aperture; if you divide the focal length through the ocular focal length you get the magnification of your set up. In this case: 2000 mm/9mm= 222 times, doubled up by the Barlow lens= 444 times; a normal pair of binoculars like a 10*50 got a magnification of 10 times!

So this image shows  Saturn with a 444 times magnification compared to the naked eye. By using a Barlow lens, like with tele converters, you double up the aperture – in this case from f 10 to f 20. And the focal length with this set up? Actually, astrophotographers don´t really talk about that, they just say: I used that set up. I calculated a focal length of almost 47 000 mm/ 47 meter!  with this set up, including the crop factor of my k-x, but I´m not sure about that… just enjoy the image!

“I was, I remember, I still remember when the first time I pointed the telescope at the sky and I saw Saturn with the rings. It was a beautiful image.”

(Umberto Guidoni, Italian Astronaut, born 1954)